The Secret Surveyor

At the beginning of the year we published a brave piece written by a fellow Surveyor about the bullying that they had experienced in the workplace. This was an important post that highlighted unacceptable behaviors, the effects of those behaviors and how we can be stronger together.

At the time we knew that this example wasn’t isolated and sadly we continue to hear similar stories of unfair treatment and discrimination that will continue all the time we are unable or unwilling to make a stand against it.

Many of us will have experienced something similar in the past or could be struggling with something as we read these words. Often it will be so subtle that we do not even recognise it, or maybe we push back against it. We may have heard about or witnessed something that we knew wasn’t fair but felt we were not placed to speak up or about it.

We have so many positive conversations about diversity and inclusion and are quick to promote good practices that seek to draw in a more diverse workforce, but when we look around us and at our own experiences can we honestly say that this is an industry where we always feel supported, encouraged, respected and happy?

If not what are we doing to change that?

The Secret Surveyor is a place where we can share our experiences and open up the conversations about our experiences to help us make the industry a better place for us all where we can all thrive.

If you would like to share anonymously please get in touch:

surveyorhood@gmail.com

Remember that Lionheart are always available to provide advice and support and can be contacted : helpline 0800 009 2960

One thought on “The Secret Surveyor

  1. Anonymous

    This has reminded me of an incident a few years ago and the nastiness that ensued. I was asked to survey some works carried out on a flat roof and was concerned about the safety of doing so. Raising the issue with my manager I was ‘told off’ for not having carried out this survey previously. I raised my concerns and was told that I was to carry out the survey forthwith and take whatever measures I deemed necessary to carry out the works. It turned out that the roof wasn’t safe and I did not carry out the survey as directed. I ended up receiving a warning for not following directions and started to be ostracised within the department. I made a complaint to HR and went through a hearing and investigation only to be informed that the complaint was unfounded. This was just the start of a campaign of bullying by the manager and others in the department. Needless to say I left shortly afterwards, forced out of my job with my confidence shattered. No matter what the consequences are, never put your safety or that of others at risk. I may have lost my job but I didn’t put my life in danger for a bully.

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